What is Clean Diesel?


Share This Page

January 23, 2017   |   Diesel Technology Forum

Policy Insider

“What does this mean for diesel?”

Because of its unmatched, proven combination of efficiency, power, performance, reliability, durability and low-emissions, diesel power is perfectly suited for the next challenges at hand. Bring it on.


Four days into a new Administration, new people and priorities, and an active media environment, comes an oft-asked question of “what does this mean?” 

We’re glad you asked. 

If we’re talking about economic growth and job creation, diesel is the prime mover for fifteen sectors of the U.S. economy that rely on diesel power to get the job done. Diesel technology creates well-paying manufacturing, sales and servicing jobs in all 50 states. Producing or servicing diesel engines directly generates more than $183 billion in annual economic activity and 1.25 million jobs.  

On the bigger issues of policy, whether we go a “clean energy future” or more “all of the above” or somewhere in between, diesel power is uniquely suited to achieve success. Energy-dense diesel has always been considered the fuel of work; moving goods and people and fueling the machines and equipment that build, lift, haul, harvest, pump and generate the power developing and developed economies need. In many cases there are no practical alternatives. That’s why it is expected to be the number one global transport fuel by 2030.   

Since 2010, all diesel engines, vehicles and equipment have used ultra-low sulfur clean diesel fuels. According to the Energy Information Administration, in 2015, refineries in the U.S. produced an average of about 19 gallons of motor gasoline and 12 gallons of ultra-low sulfur distillate fuel oil (includes diesel fuel and heating oil) from one 42-gallon barrel of crude oil. That’s about 145,000,000 barrels a month on average in 2016. In 2015, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel was America’s top petroleum export.

But if domestically produced renewable fuels become more of interest, consider that virtually all diesel engines can use some blend (typically 5 to 20 percent) of high-quality home-grown renewable biodiesel fuels, made from plant materials or (soybeans) or even waste products (animal fats). In 2015 nearly three billion gallons of advanced renewable biodiesel fuels were produced in the U.S. Diesel engines power nearly all the largest farm machines and equipment that harvest and process these and other renewable fuels and feedstocks.

Diesel power serves every kind of need. You’ll find diesel engines on the job in trucks transporting diesel fuel and trucks transporting wind turbines.  Diesel-powered marine vessels service offshore wind farms and help move barges and vessels with crude oil and refined products up and down inland waterways and ports. Bulldozers and cranes do the heavy-lifting and assembling of wind farms or photo voltaic arrays (solar panels) and help install and maintain the infrastructure for grid connections, and are at work every day at oil and gas operations in the U.S.  

And when the policy discussion turns to enhancing our infrastructure, diesel engines and equipment will be first-call, for the heavy-lifting; the building of bridges, enhancing communications infrastructure or repairing our roads.    

At 120 years in existence, diesel technology has not just endured but evolved. Because of its unmatched, proven combination of efficiency, power, performance, reliability, durability and low-emissions, diesel power is perfectly suited for the next challenges at hand.

Bring it on.  

  

 

 



More

All News & Resources


Key Contact

Ezra Finkin
Director, Policy
efinkin@dieselforum.org
301-668-7230

More Policy Insider

What is Clean Diesel?

Watch the Video