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Expanded Use Of Renewable Fuels Highlights Importance Of Clean Diesel Technology In Helping U.S. Achieve A Sustainable Energy Future

June 22, 2011 //

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Washington, D.C. – The EPA’s proposed increases in the 2012 percentage standards for advanced biofuels and renewable diesel fuel is another important step in helping the U.S. achieve a sustainable energy future, according to Allen Schaeffer, the Executive Director of the Diesel Technology Forum (DTF).

The EPA proposes to mandate the blending of 15.2 billion gallons of renewable fuel into the U.S. fuel supply, and increased the proposed mandate for advanced biofuels by 48 percent to 2 billion gallons as part of the agency’s Renewable Fuel Standard program (RFS2).

“The growing use of advanced biofuels and renewable diesel fuel underscores the expanding role clean diesel technology will continue to play as we move to a more sustainable energy future,” Schaeffer said.  “The proposed increase to one billion gallons of biomass-based diesel and two billion gallons of advanced biofuels will play a significant role in reducing emissions and our dependence on foreign oil production.

“Today’s diesel engine and equipment makers are increasingly welcoming high-quality, bio-based fuels into most diesel engines in blends of five percent to 20 percent.

“The innovation and growth in biofuel technology is happening at a rapid pace.  Thanks to advanced refining and fuel processing technologies from companies such as UOP and Amyris, the next generation of renewable diesel fuels produced with these technologies further enhances the benefits of clean diesel technology.

“EPA’s proposal supports the growing use of lower carbon fuels and will help clean diesel technology to power the U.S. economy in an increasingly sustainable manner.”


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about 13 hours ago

Did you know?

Today's clean diesel heavy-duty trucks are 98 percent cleaner than those made 10 years ago.